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17-Jul-2017 12:14 by 2 Comments

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Corrections Corporation of America (CCA), the nation’s oldest and largest for-profit private prison corporation, is commemorating its 30th anniversary throughout 2013 with a series of birthday celebrations at its facilities around the country.Over the last 30 years, CCA has benefited from the dramatic rise in incarceration and detention in the United States.

This report highlights just some of the shameful incidents that litter CCA’s history.

As the nation’s first state prison to be sold to a private company, Corrections Corporation of America’s purchase of the Lake Erie Correctional Institution for .7 million from Ohio in late 2011 was widely hailed as a “groundbreaking” move that would pave the way for other states seeking to cut costs.[1] The excitement of this transaction quickly soured when, only a year into CCA’s control of the facility, state audits found staff mismanagement, widespread violence, delays in medical treatment and “unacceptable living conditions”, including a lack of access to toilet facilities, with prisoners forced to defecate in plastic containers and bags.

Amongst numerous concerns over medical provisions, the audit detailed how staff did not follow proper procedures for chronically ill prisoners, including those with diabetes and AIDS, medical appointments were severely delayed, and prisoners were often triple-bunked or forced to sleep on mattresses on cell floors.

As well as unearthing notable scandals and violations that have taken place over the company’s last three decades, this report charts several other key areas in which CCA has left a dubious legacy.

From controversial economic and political ties to operational cost-cutting and depressing labor practices, CCA’s drastic efforts to maximize profits only serve to demonstrate the fundamental reasons why the for-profit prison industry is at odds with the goals of reducing incarceration rates and raising correctional standards.

[1] Hutto’s direction as a corrections chief was anything but rosy.

Under Hutto’s direction in Arkansas, the Supreme Court wrote, "The administrators of Arkansas' prison system evidently tried to operate their prisons at a profit. Cummins Farm, the institution at the center of this litigation, required its 1,000 inmates to work in the fields 10 hours a day, six days a week, using mule-drawn tools and tending crops by hand. The inmates were sometimes required to run to and from the fields, with a guard in an automobile or on horseback driving them on. They worked in all sorts of weather, so long as the temperature was above freezing, sometimes in unsuitably light clothing or without shoes." [2] Despite little experience or references, in November of 1983 the company landed its first contract to operate an immigrant detention center in Houston under contract with the Immigration and Naturalization Services (INS).According to Beasley, the company was founded on the principle that you could sell prisons “just like you were selling cars, or real estate, or hamburgers.” Beasley was a politically connected former head of the Tennessee Republican Party while Crants was a Nashville lawyer and businessman.Hutto, the only founder with corrections experience and a former Arkansas prison director, was at the time a Virginia state corrections director and president of the American Correctional Association.Meanwhile, several lawsuits have also drawn attention to CCA’s failure to pay even the prevailing wage rate to employees, with cases settled in 2000 at Louisiana’s Winn Correctional Center[3] and the San Diego Correctional Facility.[4] The low wages of most CCA employees certainly do not extend to its top executives.In 2011, CEO Damon Hininger was paid ,696,798, while Chairman of the Board John Ferguson received a salary of

Under Hutto’s direction in Arkansas, the Supreme Court wrote, "The administrators of Arkansas' prison system evidently tried to operate their prisons at a profit. Cummins Farm, the institution at the center of this litigation, required its 1,000 inmates to work in the fields 10 hours a day, six days a week, using mule-drawn tools and tending crops by hand. The inmates were sometimes required to run to and from the fields, with a guard in an automobile or on horseback driving them on. They worked in all sorts of weather, so long as the temperature was above freezing, sometimes in unsuitably light clothing or without shoes." [2] Despite little experience or references, in November of 1983 the company landed its first contract to operate an immigrant detention center in Houston under contract with the Immigration and Naturalization Services (INS).

According to Beasley, the company was founded on the principle that you could sell prisons “just like you were selling cars, or real estate, or hamburgers.” Beasley was a politically connected former head of the Tennessee Republican Party while Crants was a Nashville lawyer and businessman.

Hutto, the only founder with corrections experience and a former Arkansas prison director, was at the time a Virginia state corrections director and president of the American Correctional Association.

Meanwhile, several lawsuits have also drawn attention to CCA’s failure to pay even the prevailing wage rate to employees, with cases settled in 2000 at Louisiana’s Winn Correctional Center[3] and the San Diego Correctional Facility.[4] The low wages of most CCA employees certainly do not extend to its top executives.

In 2011, CEO Damon Hininger was paid $3,696,798, while Chairman of the Board John Ferguson received a salary of $1,734,793.[5] Given the pay and benefit levels offered by CCA to the majority of its staff, it is no surprise that those who are hired often do not have extensive corrections experience, nor are they provided with appropriate training.

Warm thanks to everyone who helped us in putting this report together.

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Under Hutto’s direction in Arkansas, the Supreme Court wrote, "The administrators of Arkansas' prison system evidently tried to operate their prisons at a profit. Cummins Farm, the institution at the center of this litigation, required its 1,000 inmates to work in the fields 10 hours a day, six days a week, using mule-drawn tools and tending crops by hand. The inmates were sometimes required to run to and from the fields, with a guard in an automobile or on horseback driving them on. They worked in all sorts of weather, so long as the temperature was above freezing, sometimes in unsuitably light clothing or without shoes." [2] Despite little experience or references, in November of 1983 the company landed its first contract to operate an immigrant detention center in Houston under contract with the Immigration and Naturalization Services (INS).According to Beasley, the company was founded on the principle that you could sell prisons “just like you were selling cars, or real estate, or hamburgers.” Beasley was a politically connected former head of the Tennessee Republican Party while Crants was a Nashville lawyer and businessman.Hutto, the only founder with corrections experience and a former Arkansas prison director, was at the time a Virginia state corrections director and president of the American Correctional Association.Meanwhile, several lawsuits have also drawn attention to CCA’s failure to pay even the prevailing wage rate to employees, with cases settled in 2000 at Louisiana’s Winn Correctional Center[3] and the San Diego Correctional Facility.[4] The low wages of most CCA employees certainly do not extend to its top executives.In 2011, CEO Damon Hininger was paid $3,696,798, while Chairman of the Board John Ferguson received a salary of $1,734,793.[5] Given the pay and benefit levels offered by CCA to the majority of its staff, it is no surprise that those who are hired often do not have extensive corrections experience, nor are they provided with appropriate training.Warm thanks to everyone who helped us in putting this report together.

,734,793.[5] Given the pay and benefit levels offered by CCA to the majority of its staff, it is no surprise that those who are hired often do not have extensive corrections experience, nor are they provided with appropriate training.Warm thanks to everyone who helped us in putting this report together.

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